The Maui pot

Yes a lot of people smoke weed on the islands, but that’s not the pot I am refer-ing to.

Yesterday a couple in a rental car stopped next to us along the side of the Hana Highway and approached us to get some information. They are farmers from Indiana, real farmers with 3,000 acres of family farm land. They were nice and friendly. I enjoyed chatting with them. There was one thing she mentioned that stood out for me.  She said as they were traveling from their hotel touring the land, she noticed there are a lot of people on Maui and aside from the tourists staying in hotels, there was very few housing developments. She asked herself and me, “where does everybody live.” I told her there are many hidden developments around the Island, but she hit on a critical issue, the epic housing shortage on Maui.

Here you find people occupying every type of living arrangement imaginable. There are those who live from their backpack, individuals and families who live from their car, truck or van and others who live in structures.  Those able to manifest actual “housing” might find everything from converted school buses, barns, garages, sheds and storage units. If lucky, you’ll find an actual room in a house with decent folk, studio or guest house. There are apartment buildings and homes in the larger city areas, but the competition and cost is more than most are willing to deal with, trumped by the wealthy who can over-bid asking prices.

All that being said, there is a unique and even symbiotic relationship that happens with all groups of people here. Everyone knows about the challenges we face and generally have compassion for all people.

Like anywhere, there are the few who lose control of their lives and fall into addiction to pharmaceuticals or alcohol and in turn lose control of their respect for the nature or others. Even these folks find a way to get along and are usually found in areas inhabited by the like-minded. We learn to steer clear of these folks by keeping our vibration at a frequency that shields and protects us.

The “pot” I am referring to is this melting pot of people learning to live and find the Aloha in their lives here on Maui. The police, the locals, those living in their cars and those living from their backpack find compassion for the human experience.  I’ve seen people go through some tough humbling experiences, and the strength I see in their eyes is the beauty of humanity.

The contrast to this are those who pretend that they are in control. They talk too much, name drop, show-off with behaviors influenced by television.  There are many talented people here, and eventually, like a thousand-piece jigsaw puzzle and when the ego is subdued, we find our place.

This melding is challenged by some locals who are not happy with the growing crowds on the island. We must remember. This crowding is not a Maui thing. Our exponential population growth is world-wide. There are as many folks leaving Maui as those coming in. The human desire to have three and four babies has put us in a critical situation with the growth of our population.  It’s why I left the beaches of Southern California. It was to the point I wouldn’t leave my place in Malibu on weekends for the hassle of growing traffic and delays getting to and from my place. It’s even more reason to find compassion and teach new ways of thought, and new ways of being. We are in this together.

So if you are reading this from somewhere on the island or from the frozen fields of Sweden thank you for sending a bit of compassion to all who are learning to meld together on this ever-growing experience on earth. It’s the experience of our lives.

 

Aloha

 

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